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U.P. Reader -- Issue #2

U.P. Reader — Issue #2

At last we have a link you can give to family and friends to purchase U.P. Reader — Issue #2

At the Spring Meeting, Mikel will speak about getting us into brick-and-mortar stores around the U.P.
See you on June 2nd!

 

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MARQUETTE, MI (April 27, 2018) — The U.P. Publishers and Authors Association (UPPAA) has announced the winners of its first Dandelion Cottage Short Story Contest.

UPPAA, established in 1998 as an organization for anyone from or associated with Upper Michigan who is interested in writing and publishing, has continually sought to educate its members on all aspects of writing, publishing, and book marketing. Since its founding, the organization has grown to more than one hundred authors. Its members have produced a wide variety of books ranging from U.P. history and travel books to historical fiction, mysteries, romance, fantasy, science fiction, nature, recreation, children’s books, and poetry.

The idea to hold a short story contest for high school students was the brain child of Larry Buege, UPPAA’s current treasurer and the author of several books, including his popular young adult Chogan Native American series. Buege said he was inspired to create the contest to encourage young writers because he has a granddaughter in Wisconsin who published her first novel while in the sixth grade. “I was convinced that we may have similarly talented writers in the U.P.,” Buege said.

Buege approached the rest of the UPPAA board members, who embraced the idea of a contest that would encourage students to become interested in writing and to pursue their talents. Buege also found an anonymous donor to provide financial support. He chose to name the contest after the classic children’s book Dandelion Cottage (1904) by Carroll Watson Rankin, an author from Marquette who published several children’s novels. Once the contest was announced and entries began to come in, Buege was confirmed in believing the idea was a good one. “I was not disappointed,” he said. “The quality of the submissions was beyond my expectations.”

U.P. Reader Issue #2

U.P. Reader Issue #2

The submissions were judged by a group of UPPAA members, all authors themselves. Prizes for the contest were designated to be $250 for first place, $100 for second place, and $50 for third place. However, this first year there was a tie for third place and the judges also decided to award an Honorable Mention. In addition to the cash prizes, the first place winner’s name will be engraved on a traveling trophy that will be displayed at the student’s school each year. First, second, and third place winners are also all given medallions with their names and award placement engraved on them. Finally, the first and second place winners’ stories will be published in the 2nd annual U.P. Reader, the new literary publication of UPPAA, which will be released at UPPAA’s annual meeting on June 2.

This year, the first place winner of the Dandelion Cottage Short Story Contest is Katie McEachern, a freshman from Negaunee. She won for her story “The Attack.” Second place is awarded to Emma Locknane, a junior from Gwinn, for her story “Welcome to the New Age.” Third place is awarded to both Anna Laakso, a sophomore from Republic/Michigamme, for her story “Elite” and Sarah Lauzon, a fifth grader from Ironwood for “Henry the Kitten.” Honorable Mention is awarded to Sierra Hendrickson, a freshman from Negaunee, for her story “Abducted.”

Treasurer Larry Buege and Vice President Gretchen Preston have been traveling to the schools to present the awards to the students. In addition, at the annual UPPAA conference, President Tyler Tichelaar will present the traveling trophy to the first place winner and her teacher.

The Landmark Inn, Marquette

The Landmark Inn, Marquette

UPPAA’s annual conference will be held this year at the Landmark Inn in Marquette from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. To attend the conference, visit https://uppaa.org/meeting-registration/. A full schedule of the conference, including speakers and presentations, is included at the website. Deadline for registration is May 25. Writers of all ages are welcome.

The second annual Dandelion Cottage contest is now open for entries. Full submission guidelines can be found at http://www.dandelioncottage.org/. The deadline for the contest is January 31, 2019.

-END-

Upper Peninsula Publishers & Authors Association
For Immediate Release�
Contact: Tyler Tichelaar
(906) 226-1543
President@UPPAA.org
www.UPPAA.org

 

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For Immediate Release
Contact: Tyler Tichelaar
(906) 226-1543
President@UPPAA.org
www.UPPAA.org

U.P. Publishers & Authors Association Holds 21st Annual Conference:

Publishing & Book Marketing Industry to Be Explored

Historic Landmark Hotel is the site of the 2018 meeting

MARQUETTE, MI (April 15, 2018)  -In its constant commitment to informing regional authors and publishers of the latest changes in the publishing world and offering effective marketing and writing strategies, the Upper Peninsula Publishers & Authors Association (UPPAA) will hold its 21st Annual Conference on Saturday, June 2 in Marquette at the Landmark Inn from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

As always, this year’s conference will cover a variety of topics relevant to writing, publishing, and marketing, and it will be of interest to beginning writers as well as seasoned, published authors.

This year’s keynote speaker is Steve Lehto, an attorney and writer whose family is from the Copper Country. Lehto has written several books about Michigan and automotive history among other topics. His books Death’s Door: The Truth Behind Michigan’s Largest Mass Murder, Michigan’s Columbus: The Life of Douglass Houghton, Chrysler’s Turbine Car: The Rise and Fall of Detroit’s Coolest Creation, and Preston Tucker and His Battle to Build the Car of Tomorrow were all named Michigan Notable Books by the Library of Michigan. Along with the dozen or so books he has written, he writes frequently for others such as Mopar Action magazine and Road and Track.com.

In his keynote speech, titled “From Unagented Queries to a Dozen Books With Five Different Publishers,” Lehto will discuss how he went from being an unpublished author to having a dozen books published by four different publishers (and picked up an agent along the way). Highlights of his talk will include how he writes, where his book ideas have come from, how to tell good ideas from bad, how he sold his first books without an agent, and how it happened to be that Jay Leno wrote the forewords to two of his books.

Other sessions to be held are “Children’s Book Industry 101: Terms, Conventions, How It Works, and How We Get Paid” by Carrie Pearson, “Open a Vein: The Art of Memoir in Today’s Culture” by Felicia Schneiderhan, “Life-Altering Surprises, Annoying Sisters, and Running from Danger: Using Various Forms of Conflict to Keep Readers Addicted to Your Novel” by Naomi Rawlings, “The Quest for Your Best: A Poetry Workshop” by Janeen Rastall, “The Gift of Reading: A Book-Binding Workshop” by Susan Rosemurgy, and “How to Write a Mystery in 10 Agonizing Steps” by Vickie Fee. All the speakers are members of UPPAA or authors who live in or write about Upper Michigan.

This year, UPPAA will also present the first Dandelion Cottage Awards for its student short story contest. First place winner Katie McEachern of Negaunee will be present to receive her award for her story “The Attack.” The award includes a medallion, the winner’s name on a traveling school trophy, and a $250 cash prize. Second place will be awarded to Emma Locknane of Gwinn for her story “Welcome to the New Age,” accompanied by a medallion and $100 prize. Third place was a tie. Medallions and prize money of $50 will go to both Anna Laakso of Republic/Michigamme for her story “Elite” and to Sarah Lauzon of Ironwood for “Henry the Kitten.” Honorable Mention is also given to Sierra Hendrickson of Negaunee for her story “Abducted.”

In addition, the second volume of U.P. Reader, UPPAA’s own annual literary anthology featuring works by its members, will be released. Last year’s U.P. Reader was a successful publication that helped spread the word about the organization, raise money for it, and highlight the many writers living in the U.P. This year’s issue is even bigger and better than last year’s.

Finally, there will be a business meeting, a catered lunch buffet, a book collection taken up to support the Alger County Kiwanis’ annual auction, and networking opportunities for anyone wishing to learn more about writing, publishing, and book marketing.

The general public may attend the meeting for a $15 registration fee. UPPAA members attend free of charge. Space is limited, so advanced registration is recommended. Membership details, benefits, and registration are available online at www.uppaa.org. A catered deli lunch is available for $10 per person with advance reservations required. For questions, contact membership secretary Brandy Thomas at uppaa.membership@gmail.com or (509) 675-2487. To register by mail, send a check payable to UPPAA to Brandy Thomas, 140 Youngs Road, Gwinn, MI 49841. Registrations online or by mail must be received no later than May 25.

Established in 1998 to support authors and publishers who live in or write about Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, UPPAA is a Michigan nonprofit association with more than 100 members, many of whose books are featured on the organization’s website at www.uppaa.org. UPPAA welcomes membership and participation from anyone with a UP connection who is interested in writing and publishing books.

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Landmark-Hotel-Marquette-U.P.-Winter-2014-13UPPAA Spring 2018 Meeting

Register online now!
Saturday, June 2nd, 2018 at the Landmark Inn.  Sessions will be in the Harbor Room (basement) and the Board Room (1st Floor)

Conference Schedule

  • 10:00 – 10:30 – Registration in the Harbor Room
  • 10:30 – 10:45 – Welcome and Opening remarks in the Harbor Room
  • 10:45 – 11:45 – Keynote, Steve Lehto, “From Unagented Queries to a Dozen Books with Five Different Publishers,” Harbor Room
  • 11:45 – 12:45   Two tracks to choose from:
    (A) Carrie Pearson, “Children’s Book Industry 101: Terms, Conventions, How it Works, and How We Get Paid,” Harbor Room
    (B) Felicia Schneiderhan, “Open a Vein: The Art of Memoir in Today’s Culture,” Board Room
  • 12:45 – 1:30 Lunch
  • 1:30 – 2:00 Business Meeting – including drawing, release of UP Reader, and presentation of short story contest awards, Harbor Room
  • 2:15 – 3:15  Two tracks to choose from:
    (A) Naomi Rawlings, “Life-Altering Surprises, Annoying Sisters, and Running from Danger: Using Various Forms of Conflict to Keep Readers Addicted to your Novel,” Harbor Room
    (B) Janeen Rastall, “The Quest for Your Best: A Poetry Workshop” Board Room (projector)
  • 3:15 – 4:15 Two tracks to choose from:
    (A) Susan Rosemurgy, “The Gift of Reading: A Book-Binding Workshop,” Board Room
    (B) Vickie Fee: “How to Write a Mystery in 10 Agonizing Steps”
  • 4:15 – 5:00 – Networking and Clean Up

Session Descriptions

Keynote — Steve Lehto: From Unagented Queries to a Dozen Books With Five Different Publishers

Steve Lehto is an attorney and writer whose family is from the Copper Country. He has written several books about Michigan and automotive history among other topics. Death’s Door: The Truth Behind Michigan’s Largest Mass Murder, Michigan’s Columbus: The Life of Douglass Houghton, Chrysler’s Turbine Car: The Rise and Fall of Detroit’s Coolest Creation, and Preston Tucker and His Battle to Build the Car of Tomorrow, were all named Michigan Notable Books by the Library of Michigan. Along with the dozen or so books he has written, he writes frequently for others such as Mopar Action magazine and Road and Track.com. In his presentation, he will discuss how he went from being an unpublished author to having a dozen books published by four different publishers (and picked up an agent along the way). Highlights of his talk will include how he writes, where his book ideas have come from (and how to tell the good ideas from the bad), how he sold his first books without an agent, and how it happened to be that Jay Leno wrote the forewords to two of his books.

Susan Rosemurgy: The Gift of Reading:A Book-Binding Workshop

In this hands-on workshop we will explore different book-binding techniques and themes. Everyone will have the tools and materials to make and take their own book nested in origami boxes to then give the gift of reading.

Susan Rosemurgy is an author, illustrator, and art teacher. She teaches at Calumet High School in the Copper Country. Her work includes Copper Country Stories, now in its 2nd edition, and her latest book U.P. Stories (both from Mudminnow Press). These books invite readers to add and share their stories about life around the Great Lakes within the pages and pockets of the books. In her quest to connect people to art and stories she has also designed a series of book-making kits that she has produced. In this interactive session she will lead participants in her unique approach to making books with the first in the series of book-making kits, Tablespoon Books in Boxes. Everyone will have the tools and materials to make and take their own book nested in origami boxes to then give the gift of reading. Learn more about her work at her website: susanrosemurgy.com

Janeen Pergrin Rastall: The Quest for Your Best: A Poetry Workshop

This poetry workshop will discuss writing techniques: how to get past the white space, where to go from your first draft and when to give your work a rest. Revision techniques will be presented from poets: William Stafford, Jack Ridl and the presenter, Janeen Pergrin Rastall. Feel free to bring a poem in need of repair.

Janeen Pergrin Rastall is the author of In the Yellowed House (dancing girl press, 2014) and Objects May Appear Closer (Celery City Chapbooks, 2015). She is a co-author of True Companions (Gordon Publications, 2017) and Heart Radicals (About Editions, 2018). She has been nominated multiple times for the Pushcart Prize and the Best of the Net Award.

Carrie Pearson: Children’s Book Industry 101: Terms, Conventions, How it Works, and How We Get Paid

This is a nuts and bolts session for writers and writer/illustrators to learn how the children’s book industry works. Topics include: standards for traditional publishing (formatting, word counts for categories, conventions, what’s pushy, what’s polite), how the industry works (role of agent vs. editor, publishing houses and what they offer, large house vs. small vs. regional), and how we get paid (advance, royalties). Session includes Q&A and a handout.

Carrie Pearson grew up as a troll but after 22 years in Marquette, can’t imagine living anywhere else. She feels that being a children’s book author represents the best merger of her education, occupations, and passion. She holds a BA in early childhood education, taught at University of Michigan’s preschool and then moved into the business world for 15+ years. She is now a full-time writer for children and owner of a consulting business in the children’s book industry that focuses on preparing writers to connect with the right agent and/or editors. She is a regional advisor for the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators (SCBWI) and is represented by Kelly Sonnack at the Andrea Brown Literary Agency. Her first two books were published by Arbordale and are nature nonfiction picture books. Her third launches October 2018 with Charlesbridge and is also a nature nonfiction picture book about the world’s tallest tree. Her next projects are a picture book biography and a nonfiction picture book survey of real-life princesses. Carrie would love to connect with you on Twitter @carrieapearson, Pinterest carrieapearson, and at her website http://www.carriepearsonbooks.com.

Felicia Schneiderhan: Open a Vein: The Art of Memoir in Today’s Culture

The quote “Writing is easy: All you do is open a vein and bleed” is attributed to number of famous writers. Whoever actually said it – they may very well have been a memoir writer. Felicia’s presentation will trace some paths of memoir writing today: How to write it (when to spill your guts and when to protect your truth); and where to publish (and even make some cash). Felicia will also discuss the writing process—schedules, writing groups, workshops, and conferences—and read excerpts from her work.

Felicia Schneiderhan is the author of the memoir Newlyweds Afloat: Married Bliss and Mechanical Breakdowns While Living on a Trawler. Her shorter memoir pieces appear in Real Simple, Lake Superior Magazine, and many anthologies and literary journals. She currently writes from her home in Duluth, where she lives with her Yooper husband Mark and three tsunamis who always seem to find the closet she’s writing in. www.feliciaschneiderhan.com

Naomi Rawlings: Life-Altering Surprises, Annoying Sisters, and Running from Danger: Using Various Forms of Conflict to Keep Readers Addicted to Your Novel

When editors, agents, or readers pick up your book, do they find themselves submersed in a story that they can’t put down? This workshop on conflict covers everything from making sure the central conflict is strong enough to sustain a novel-length plot, to starting your story in the right place, to using micro-tension to both keep your book riveting during smaller scenes and relate to your readers.

Naomi Rawlings is the author of ten historical Christian novels, including the Amazon bestselling Eagle Harbor Series. She first started writing in 2008, and to date, her books include four traditionally published novels and six self-published novels. She has been nominated for two Christian publishing awards, enjoys coaching other writers, and moonlights as a novel editor once in a while. She lives with her husband and three children in the Copper Country.

Vickie Fee: How to Write a Mystery in 10 Agonizing Steps

This session will look at the basic elements and structure of the traditional mystery, including: the engaging detective, the body drop, suspicious characters, clues and red herrings, whodunit—and the big payoff.

Vickie Fee is author of the Liv & Di in Dixie cozy mystery series. Her latest release is Til Death Do Us Party.

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Nicole Fende, author of How to be a Finance Rock Star

Nicole Fende, author of How to be a Finance Rock Star

As a successful self-published author I understand your struggles and challenges.  Even the best authors in the business need outside help in putting together a quality book. This help costs money, but you can’t make money until you publish your book (or so you’ve been told).  This Catch-22 is enough to discourage the most optimistic author.

There are ways to raise money before your book hits the printing press.  Leveraging my background in finance, creative right brain approach to problem solving, and personal experience I’ve created a list of 14 ways you can fund your self-published book.  This is my gift to you, one author to another.

Also checkout her podcast presentation from the UPPAA 2014 Spring Conference

  1. Sell the right to name a character in your upcoming book.
  2. For a non-fiction book sell the opportunity to be a case study in the book.
  3. Make your character development pay.  Turn your character backgrounds into short stories and sell them electronically – Kindle, Nook, Smashwords, or even through your own website.
  4. Sell your book as a series during the writing process.  Chapter 1 becomes the first episode in the series.  You build a following, earn money, and get feedback.  When the book is complete sell it in its entirety – your fan base will buy it and spread the word.
  5. Leveraging Kickstarter, Indie Go-Go or similar crowdfunding tool, you can run a pre-sale before you even type a single page of text.
  6. Get a patron.  This old world idea has resurfaced using cutting edge technology.  Visit Patreon to learn how you can attract your own patron(s).
  7. Leverage a Common Cause (Fiction) – Perhaps your book involves a Spotted Owl, and the story would help raise awareness or interest in its threatened status.  Groups working to protect the Spotted Owl may be interested in pre-ordering your book or even a straight grant to fund it.
  8. Specific Interest (Fiction) – Niche topics can be very lucrative if properly managed.  Let’s say you’re planning to write a book on vampires in space.  People who enjoy these types of books will be thirsty, no pun intended, for new literature.  Great for pre-orders and crowdfunding.
  9. Target Audience (Fiction) – Here in the U.S. there are many groups focused on literacy, particularly for children.  Finding relatable fiction for specific groups (such as Native Americans or immigrants from countries with significantly different customs) can be a challenge.  If your book includes such groups they may be interested in sponsoring your work.
  10. Leverage a Common Cause (Nonfiction) – Does your story share a person’s experience dealing with a specific challenge, such as breast cancer, alcoholism, or death of a loved one?  Groups created to address these issues should be approached for pre-orders or straight funding in exchange for a mention of their organization in the book.
  11. Specific Interest (Nonfiction) – Let’s say you are writing a book on EFT (Emotionally Focused Therapy), including expected results and how to select your service provider. EFT Practitioners interested in writing a chapter for you, or being included as a recommended resource in the book, may be open to paying for the opportunity.  For them it’s a way to gain credibility – just be sure you select carefully as you are hitching your reputation to theirs.
  12. Target Audience (Nonfiction) – When I was working on my first book, How to be a Finance Rock Star: The Small Business Owner’s Ticket to Multi-Platinum Profits, I wanted to include QR codes to make my book more interactive.  Pitney Bowes had recently launched a QR Code service, targeting small business owners.  I was able to approach them to trade QR Code services, as well as a sponsorship of my book launch, for inclusion in my book.
  13. Writer in Residence – Writers-in-residence programs support authors by providing a monthly stipend and paid teaching opportunities, along with the time and space to complete a manuscript.  Examples include Hugo House, Thurber House, and James Merrill House.
  14. Barter for services.  Need a graphic designer to create your book cover?  Try offering your writing services in exchange for their work.  Barter is no different than working for cash, be sure you create a contract and treat your barter client the same as any other.

Looking for even more ways to profit from your self-published book?  See how else I can help at www.TheNumbersWhisperer.com/BookProfit .

To your success & happiness –

Nicole Fende, A.S.A.

The Numbers Whisperer® 

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Lee LaForge, Book World Marquette

Lee LaForge, Book World Marquette

Working with a Bookstore

Lee LaForge, manager of the Marquette Book World, will share how bookstores decide what books to carry, how you can work with bookstores to get your book in the inventory, ordering and payment policies, book signings, and why customers may choose your book over another, or not.

Click here to play the presentation using the Bandcamp Player

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Peter White Public Library (Marquette, Michigan)

Details of the UPPAA’s Spring Meeting in Marquette, Michigan on May 17th, 2014  have just been released.  Please register now so you are guaranteed a seat at the event!

The schedule is still tentative but here is the working draft:

10:00 – 10:30 – registration

10:30 – 10:45 – opening remarks

10:45 – 12:00
Children’s Book Industry 101: Terms, Conventions, and How it Works – Carrie Pearson, Shiras Room
Public Speaking 101 – Frida Waara, Community Room

12:00 – 1:00
A Beginner’s Guide to Blogging – Dara Beevas and Amy Quale, Community Room
How to Profit from Your Self-Published Book – Nicole Fende, Shiras Room

1:00 – 2:00 – lunch and short business meeting – election of new officers

2:00 – 3:00 p.m.
How Successful Authors Sell More Books Using Social Media – Dara Beevas and Amy Quale, Community Room
Working with a Bookstore – Lee LaForge, Shiras Room

3:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Working with a Printer vs. Print-On-Demand – Cheryl Corey, Shiras Room
Writing Fiction: Character Development, Point of View, and Plot – Donna Winters, Jenifer Brady, and Tyler Tichelaar, Community Room

 4:00 p.m. Networking and cleanup

Session Descriptions:

Children’s Book Industry 101: Terms, Conventions, and How It Works

This is a nuts and bolts session for writers and writer/illustrators to learn how the children’s book industry works. Topics include: standards for traditional publishing (formatting, word counts for categories, conventions, what’s pushy, what’s polite), how the industry works (role of agent vs. editor, publishing houses and what they offer, large house vs. small vs. regional), and how we get paid (advance, royalties).

Public Speaking 101

Frida Waara will draw on her years of experience in public speaking to discuss the basics of engaging your audience when speaking. Besides sharing tips and techniques, she will give feedback to participants who want to practice their short elevator pitches about their books. Participants are asked to attend prepared with a short one minute elevator pitch about their books to be critiqued.

A Beginner’s Guide to Blogging

Blogging is all about getting your voice heard on your terms, but did you also know that it’s a great tool for creating an author platform, connecting with an audience, marketing a project, and even creating content for a book? Discover how you can use a blog’s unstructured format to your advantage and make your voice go viral.

How to Profit from Your Self-Published Book

Self-publishing can be a great way to bring your book to market. Done right it can generate a modest profit (sometimes even before you publish). Done wrong it can be one big money pit. Learn some easy to implement ways to get your book to pay for itself. Presented by self-published author and small business finance expert Nicole Fende, a.k.a. The Numbers Whisperer ™.

How Successful Authors Sell More Books Using Social Media

Subscription lists. Giveaways. Guest posts. Being a bestselling author requires more than just a great book; it requires a bestselling brand. Navigating the waters of social media can make it happen, but you need to know what tips and tricks make it really stick. Some tools are better than others, and this talk will help you discover which ones are right for you.

Working with a Bookstore

Lee LaForge, manager of the Marquette Book World, will share how bookstores decide what books to carry, how you can work with bookstores to get your book in the inventory, ordering and payment policies, book signings, and why customers may choose your book over another, or not.

Working with a Printer vs. Print-On-Demand

Cheryl Corey of book printer McNaughton-Gunn will cover the most recent developments in printing and self-publishing. She will explain what you need to know when working with a printer from paper selection to binding styles, and the pros and cons of using print-on-demand technology versus traditional offset printing.

Writing Fiction: Character Development, Point of View, and Plot

Novelists Donna Winters, Jenifer Brady, and Tyler Tichelaar will discuss three major components of writing fiction—character development, point of view, and plot—including how they make decisions on these components and what is needed to make them effective. They also will share their own writing tips and experiences as well as theories about writing fiction and mistakes people should avoid when writing novels.

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